Blog Health and Wellness

FireFit!

What makes us fit for duty? Training.

What training are we referring to? Tasks used to perform our job. Whether it be a technical rescue, hazmat knowledge, ARFF, district familiarization or countless other avenues, as firefighters we are called upon to know an extremely wide range of skills to perform our duties and go home at the end of our shifts.

While this knowledge is part of the necessary tools needed to perform, almost half of our brothers and sisters who pay the ultimate price do so because of overexertion. When called upon to fight fires, it takes an enormous amount of physical exertion to do our job, yet we aren’t physically training for the arduous tasks we will probably encounter.

That’s where Firefit Firefighter Fitness Trainer comes in. This machine mimics the most strenuous of fireground activities in a compact unit that will fit in the corner of most fire station truck rooms. In some cases, departments are replacing the cumbersome entrance exam equipment with Firefit. It’s turn key, requires virtually no set up and is modeled after the CPAT, with a couple of exceptions of course. Just drag the machine from the truck room to the station apron, or use it inside if you have the space for it.

Firefit was created and tested by Randy Johnson, a 14 yr firefighter in the Texas Panhandle, 13 of those as a career firefighter. His personal results while doing a six-week testing program were nothing short of phenomenal. Starting with his heart rate, Day 1 resting heart rate was 66, working HR in the 180’s and recovery time to resting was 14 minutes. His body fat was 22%. Weight was 202. After six weeks using Firefit as his only training, and only on duty for a total usage of 15 times, his HR was in the 150’s during the workout; recovery time dropped to 4.5 minutes! Randy lost 7 lbs, gained back 2 (probably muscle), and lost 4% bodyfat.

While these results are amazing in themselves, the reason for the creation of Firefit, according to Randy, is to reduce the number of names we put on the wall in Colorado Springs and Emmitsburg every September and October, respectively. After all, isn’t that the goal and why we train to be the best at what we do?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Research

The Station Pride Journal of Firefighter Research & Wellness

We’re pleased to introduce The Station Pride Journal of Firefighter Research & Wellness. We will be publishing journal articles reporting our findings and conclusions drawn from data collected with the Station Pride Firefighter Survey that took place between September of 2016 and January of 2017. Ten Thousand Firefighters took the voluntary survey. An image preview is provided below, or you can download the PDF file under “Download”

Download

Volume 1 Number 1 

 

Health and Wellness

Firefighter Depression

Secret Signs of Hidden Depression

People who suffer from secret or concealed depression usually do not want to acknowledge how serious their feelings are. They often put on a “happy face” for others so they do not feel judged. Click HERE to find out what the six signs of concealed depression are.

DEPRESSION

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a constant feeling of sadness, hopelessness, anger, and loss of interest in everyday life for a long period of time. The exact cause of depression is unknown, however, many researchers believe that depression is caused by chemical imbalances in the brain. Norepinephrine, seratonin and dopamine are neurotransmitters (chemical messengers that transmit electrical signals between brain cells) thought to be involved with major depression. It is believed that there is an increased risk for developing depression if there is a family history of the illness. However, people who do not have a family history of depression can still develop this mood disorder.

About 19 million Americans battle depression annually. Depression is estimated to contribute to half of all suicides. About 5%-10% of women and 2%-5% of men will experience at least one major depressive episode during their adult life. Depression affects people of all races, incomes, ages, and ethnic and religious backgrounds, but it is three to five times more common in the elderly than in young people.

“Some types of depression seem to run in families”

Causes, incidence, and risk factors:

Certain personality traits such as low self-esteem, physical or sexual abuse, financial issues, and the death of a loved one can often times trigger depression in some people. While it has long been believed that depression caused people to misuse alcohol and drugs in an attempt to make themselves feel better (self-medication), it is now thought that substance abuse can actually cause depression. Some illnesses such as heart disease, cancer, and certain medications may also trigger depressive episodes. It is also important to note that many depressive episodes occur spontaneously and are not triggered by a life crisis, physical illness or other risks.

 

There is no single cause of major depression. Psychological, biological and environmental factors may all contribute to its development. Whatever the specific causes of depression, scientific research has firmly established that major depression is a biological, medical illness.

 A number of factors can play a role in depression:

  • Life events or situations, such as: Breaking up with a significant other, illness or death in the family, or parents divorcing (for adolescents)
  • Repetitive traumatic calls
  • Childhood events, such as abuse or neglect
  • Divorce, death of a friend or relative, or loss of a job (for adults)
  • Social isolation (common in the elderly)
  • Medical conditions such as hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid), medications (such as sedatives and high blood pressure medications), cancer, major illness, or prolonged pain
  • Sleeping problems, Sleep deprivation
  • Alcohol or drug abuse

Symptoms

  • Agitation, restlessness, and irritability
  • Dramatic change in appetite, often with weight gain or loss
  • Extreme difficulty concentrating
  • Fatigue and lack of energy
  • Feelings of hopelessness and helplessness
  • Feelings of worthlessness, self-hate, and inappropriate guilt
  • Inactivity and withdrawal from usual activities, a loss of interest or pleasure in activities that were once enjoyed (such as sex)
  • Thoughts of death or suicide
  • Trouble sleeping or excessive sleeping
  • Depression can appear as anger and discouragement, rather than as feelings of hopelessness and helplessness. Use of alcohol or illegal substances may be more likely to occur.
  • Even Medicines that you take for other problems could cause or worsen depression, check with your doctor.

 Treatment

  • Medicines that you take for other problems could cause or worsen depression. You may need to change them. DO NOT change or stop taking any of your medications without consulting your doctor.
  • People who are so severely depressed that they are unable to function, or who are suicidal and cannot be safely cared for in the community may need to be treated in a psychiatric hospital.
  • Most people benefit from antidepressant drug therapy, along with psychotherapy. As treatment takes effect, negative thinking diminishes. It takes time to feel better, but there are usually day-to-day improvements.
  • Antidepressant medications work by increasing the availability of neurotransmitters or by changing the sensitivity of the receptors for these chemical messengers.

Prevention

  • Take medications correctly and learn how to manage side effects.
  • Learn to watch for early signs that depression is becoming worse and know how to react when it does.
  • Try to exercise more, seek out other activities that bring you pleasure, and maintain good sleep habits.
  • Avoid alcohol and illegal drugs. These substances can make the depression worse over time, and may also impair your judgment about suicide.
  • When struggling with your depression, talk to someone you trust about how you are feeling. Try to be around people who are caring and positive.
  • Try volunteering or getting involved in group activities.

“therapy teaches depressed people ways of fighting negative thoughts”

Types of help (See also Types of Counseling)

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy teaches depressed people ways of fighting negative thoughts. People can learn to be more aware of their symptoms, learn what seems to make depression worse, and learn problem-solving skills.
  • Psychotherapy can help someone with depression understand the issues that may be behind their behaviors, thoughts, and feelings.
  • Joining a support group of people who are experiencing problems like yours can also help. Ask your therapist or doctor for a recommendation.

You can take a personal assessment  here.

 

Blog

For Those Who Can’t…

You know, this started out as a Facebook status, but I…I had to keep writing and adding to it.

You see, today (Monday 9/12/16 – the day after the 15 year anniversary of the twin tower attacks) I’m in the weight room. I’m cracked out on pre-workout, doing chest day. Slamming weight in silence; no headphones, no TV. Nothing. Just the weight.

Today, I have a lot on my mind. And I mean a lot. 

This weekend I met firefighters from around the globe, I met rookies and chiefs. I met FDNY firemen. I met pipers and drummers. 

Let me back up, Saturday the 10th was my 31st birthday. I also did the 911 Memorial Stair Climb in Dallas that day. That’s when my mind started this post.  

On Sunday, I met Jeff Cool, FDNY “Black Sunday” survivor. I met John Walters, FDNY 9/11/01 survivor. I scaled another 110 floor stair climb in Ft Worth that was open to firefighters and anybody wanting to climb for a fallen military member or first responder.

Today, before I came to the gym, I learned of a fireman from my department that was a career fireman, and currently a volunteer, is in grave condition due to cancer.

This is where my mind is at; if you’re still here reading this, then thank you. I’m getting to the point soon, I promise.

There are millions of motivational fitness and fire service training quotes, articles, and pictures out there, but for firemen, there are two that I can think of.

Only TWO!!

One: Get fit and train for the people you serve.

Two: Get fit and train for the people that would do ANYTHING to be able to walk in your shoes again.

We owe it to the men and women in and out of the fire service to be as selfless as possible.

The fire service has never been about self, nor should it be, in my opinion. People asked, “Why are you doing two climbs? You’re crazy!”

I didn’t do it for me. I did it for those who can’t. I took names to the top of those towers that are deceased FDNY firefighters. I took names and memories of friends and family that are deceased or not physically able to climb.

A good friend’s father passed away awhile back, I wore his name on my helmet. I brought up memories of his pride in his son and his friendliness towards me in my heart. There’s many others that where in my heart as well. My grandfathers, grandmothers and so on…

 

 

The team from my dept took OUR (ownership…different article for another day) department name to the top in Dallas, while our department, short staffed, took a beating from 911 calls at home.

 

 

Sometimes we have to beat the hell out of our own bodies while we have the ability to do-so. We should do it for the people that’d love to be healthy enough to do it too.

 

Blog

Get Over Yourselves!

Rest Easy Sister Nicole Mittendorff

As most of you have probably heard, there is growing evidence that the death of a Virginia female firefighter may be the result, in part, of bullying by fellow firefighters.

If that turns out to be true, then it is scary, sad, and shameful to all who bullied her and the profession. There is no reason for it! If it turns out not to be the case, we should not dismiss the subject. Instead, we should have a very clear and lengthy dialogue about the subject of bullying and the treatment of, not only to females but anyone who doesn’t fit the “mold” in our department.

ffr-3As a former Fire Chief, I ask myself, “Why does it have to be that way?” I have witnessed first hand what female firefighters go through, and I took swift action in cases involving my department. However, I have close friends that are female firefighters, and I hear about the terrible things they go through. They continue to be bullied or simply treated much differently because they aren’t male. It’s absurd, and needs to be addressed. The problem in most situations is that the department leaders are part of the problem or that are too inept as leaders to handle it. The leadership in a lot of departments are part of the “old order” in that they think a female’s place is to be an auxiliary member, a supporting member, a secretary or in the kitchen making sandwiches. They don’t believe or understand that female firefighters are capable of doing this job and doing it well!

An article by CBC News Canada notes that almost every female firefighter in Canada has been bullied in some form or fashion. I would argue that the same goes for the U.S. The opportunity for this type of situation to happen is staggering, and it needs to be addressed at all levels. Verbal or sexual abuse/harassment and hazing are just a few of the most unprofessional forms of mistreatment that are found in the fire service. Why, if we are the professional firefighters or leaders in the community, should we even consider putting up with that type of activity? Are we turning a blind eye to it like we do other things? Are we saying that it’s not our problem? Or are we telling ourselves that it’s not happening or won’t happen in our department? All of those things may imageshelp you sleep at night but they are the coward’s way of handling the problem, and they will not promote any real progress on the issue.

So what can we do? Let’s mull over a few things and see where it takes us:

  1. Promote a dialogue: Your female firefighters may feel that they are unable to talk to you directly because issues should be brought up the chain of command. This issue is of such great importance that it needs to be addressed by you directly. Keep in mind that some of your command staff may be part of the problems, so give your firefighters an opportunity to bring their issue to you.
  2. Give them some immunity: Your female firefighters should not have any fear of retaliation or disciplinary action for revealing to you that they are getting harassed. They need to know they can count on you to help them, just like you would help one of their brother firefighters.
  3. Know when to remove yourself: If you are part of the problem then give them an avenue to talk to your boss. You were man enough to be part of the problem, so take what is coming to you. If you are that worried about your career, then you shouldn’t have been a part of the harassment in the first place. Real leaders recognize that they have made a mistake and deal with the consequences. If you are protecting the harassers, then you need to go down with them. You are a cancer on this great profession that needs to be removed.
  4. Support them as much as you can: When a female firefighter comes to you with a harassment complaint, give them all of the support they need. They may feel like they are on their own and them knowing that they have at least one person in their corner gives them the courage to fight for what is right.
  5. Make their options clear to them: Make sure they know what steps they need to take to bring a resolution to their situation. Most agencies have a policy for harassment, so make sure they clearly understand what that policy is and how to make their way through it. Make sure all the proper steps are followed. You don’t want to be the reason there was a failure to resolve their issue. You should know the policy better than anyone.
  6. Don’t judge and don’t be an a**hole: The issue they bring to you is very real. Try to look at it from their perspective and try to understand what they are feeling. The issue at hand may seem trivial to you, but it is important to them. Don’t be condescending or tell them to, “Suck it up; that’s the way it is in the firehouse!” They are most likely describing the tip of an iceberg in your department. If you investigate, you may find that you have a much bigger problem. If your first instinct is to try to hide your findings or dismiss the issue, then you should resign immediately because you don’t deserve to hold the position you have in one of the greatest professions on earth, you COWARD!
  7. Be the face of change: If you find yourself and your department in the midst of a bullying issue, be a true agent of change. Take all of the steps necessary to fix the problem. That may mean that you need to take disciplinary action against or terminate your “buddies”, but you need to do what the taxpayers pay you to do. It is YOUR responsibility to make it right! NO MATTER WHAT THE COST!

One of my favorite Lieutenants was a female. She taught me a great deal about this job and how to do it well. She was a role model of how to be a good leader. We had many discussions about being a female in a male-dominated profession. She didn’t take any crap from anyone and admitted that it was never easy. “Sometimes you need to be more of a man than they are,” she would say. I znyK.So.79found it humorous at the time, but it made sense. She had to teach quite a few firefighters how to be men and how to do this job. She knew that some of them were scared to work with her. She would show them that the job could be done and how to follow a female leader.

I am sure that most of you know a female firefighter and have heard about what they go through. Someone very close to me is a female firefighter, and she has dealt with harassment for many years. Most of her department leaders have brushed off her complaints as “business as usual” in the fire service. Subsequently, she is looking to leave this line of work. She is tired of the macho neanderthals treating her like a second-class citizen even after she has proven herself to be a good (if not better than they are) firefighter. It is sad to see it happen because she had a real passion for the job that got snuffed out by weak Chiefs or department leaders who didn’t have the stones to take on the problem. I wonder how many other great firefighters have given up and left the business because of bullying.

So what are your thoughts? Do you have the ability to see a problem and fix it in your department or are you among those who take the cowards way out and ignore it?

Talk to your female firefighters about bullying. You will be surprised what you hear!

Blog Health and Wellness

Stickers

I am going to start this article off with a minor disclaimer before we get into the meat of the post.

First, yes, I said meat…and this is not going to be anything about fire department-related decals. For all you Ricky Rescue whacker-babies, I apologize.

Memorial stickers, roadside crosses adorned with flowers, wreaths, bears and any other sort of roadside memorial markers are seen all over the place by passers-by. Literally coast to coast, city streets, major highways and winding dirt roads have something that people use to get a little closer, and there is nothing wrong with it.

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What people outside emergency services don’t know or consider is what that scene looked like before it was cleaned up enough to open the roadway back up. What the cars looked like just after the wreck. What the scene was like when we were inside the cars, trying to save a life.

What that scene looks like inside our minds every time we pass one of those roadside reminders.

In and around the city I currently work for, there are three different memorial decals that the locals have for three separate incidents that I just so have happened to have been called to. These three wrecks stand out to me because of the nature of each call. All three scenes involved a fatality or multiple fatalities and all have permanently scarred my mind. I literally see those stickers daily. Is it wrong of the owner to have them? Of course not. Do they, would they or should they understand why I cringe when I look up and read a name or see a date? Again, of course not. It’s my job. I signed up for this.

As I mentioned in my article “Ghosts,” I had made a decision on one of those fatality calls that could have jeopardized my career, and not only that, the quality of life of a patient that lived in the same passenger compartment. I have since handled that ghost. It comes back every time I drive down that street or see one of the window decals. Another decal I regularly see is usually in the morning when I drop my son off at school. The people ahead of me don’t know me from Adam, and in fact, I don’t know them. But I do know the names on their back window. I go back to that cold, muddy morning. A splintered telephone pole, air bags deployed, crushed metal and that smell…

“That smell…”

We ALL know about it. I can smell it every time I see those names.

The crosses I see along the two most highly-traveled highways around have multiple crosses/memorials laid out at locations that I can remember the scene. I can remember the rubble and devastation that had occurred just moments before our arrival.

imageThere are 2-3 along the highway while traveling one direction and a few more while coming back. One location the patient was not from here, and it’s obvious by the condition of the cross as it was placed some six years ago. That guy was ejected, pinned under the vehicle and had a limb entrapped between a passenger door and the “B” post. The entire scene was on top of an ant bed.

Another set, yes “set”, of crosses sit at a railroad intersection in the response area of my first volunteer department. I make it a point to go by there once a year or so.

I can picture all those faces like it happened yesterday, and that wreck was nearly ten years ago. I get a vacant look on my face; I can almost feel it. My mind races back to the incident that memorial was dedicated for. I relive it for a few seconds, and I drag my brain back to whatever it was I was doing.

Am I any different than any of the firefighters reading this right now?

NOT AT ALL!!!

My ghosts do not affect my day to day. Generally speaking, I have pretty good control. My situation is more of a traumatic scene observation more than a direct traumatic experience towards me. I speak a little more openly about it than most firefighters I know, and that scares me. I’m scared for them.

We all have ghosts, skeletons, and demons. We all have scenes in our minds of calls that we cannot ever forget. You know what? It is completely OK to handle your mental health however you see fit within healthy and legal limitations, of course.

I have handled my ghosts, and I handle them every day. One call specifically, I have not gone a day without seeing that kid’s face, and I have dealt with it in my own way. I have reached out to a mentor. I have stress outlets in my life, and I know for a fact that I have a support team if I ever need one. A few days after the incident, I was speaking with a mentor about it on duty. I had to get it off my chest. Right in the middle of the conversation the bells rang for an ambulance call. I had fallen, and I had gotten back on my horse.

Just like you do!

Reach out brothers and sisters! Find your way of dealing with the things we see. Things that we can’t let go of ourselves and that society unknowingly won’t everkrome1 let us forget.

We are here for each other.

First responder mental heath and suicide is something I refuse to take lightly. I’ve known people that have taken their lives because of the things they couldn’t get out of their heads.

They didn’t ask for help.

Below is a link for two of our already published articles. Also, below is the website and a suicide prevention phone number directed specifically for first responders.

Ghosts

My Brother’s Keeper

www.safecallnow.org
206-459-3020
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Health and Wellness

Firefighters and Alcohol Abuse

Blog

Ghosts

Any amount of time put into this career will most certainly riddle the corners of your brain with calls that shake you, give you chills and/or wake you up with cold sweats, some months or even years after the run. We all have them or something like them. I call them my “ghosts”. Everybody handles them different, some are good at separating themselves from the incident and never think twice about it. Some wear every bad run on their sleeves, and you know, that’s ok too.

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Without too many details, one of my “ghosts” that visits me regularly is from a Christmas eve fatality wreck. Kids in an unfortunate circumstance put my crew and myself on a scene that would later prove difficult to separate myself from, because of a decision I made in a split second that could have not only cut my career short but could have potentially made a patient unable to walk ever again.
That’s just one of a few I have, I handled it my way and went on about life. Some don’t handle these calls easily and others never even show a sign that they cared. But what resources do you have if you need to talk about your “ghosts”. At that time all I really had was my brothers, which I think should be our number one crutch for situations like these. Some departments have a full blown PTSD resource, which is great and had i asked, my department might have had one as soon as possible but I don’t actually know.image

The point I’m trying to make is to use your resources, make an effort to rid yourself of your “ghosts” when they begin to interrupt your daily life. Discuss with your brothers, your officers or chief officers whenever you need to. Get it off your chest, get help. Professional and volunteer civil servant suicide rates are way too abundant. Firefighters are notoriously tough, BUT IT DOES NOT MAKE YOU LESSER OF A MAN TO REACH OUT TO YOUR BROTHERS OR ANYBODY ELSE FOR SOME HELP.

For Help with your ghosts Visit FireStrong.org
For Help with your ghosts Visit FireStrong.org

 

Health and Wellness

Crisis Intervention

As much as we like to think of ourselves as unbreakable, we break, and when we do it’s usually hard and fast. If this feeling of being in crisis comes we may not feel comfortable to reach out for support. It’s embedded in our DNA that we are firefighters and we are supposed to fix problems.

Our exposures to high stress calls and events have given us the ability to overcome our feelings and work through them. Over time we store up our issues until they may overflow into other parts of our life. Sure, we may use dark humor or sarcastic remarks to move past our own feelings and continue to do our jobs but what happens when the floor falls out from under us, and we or a friend needs help.image

If we finally do decide to accept help we will need somebody we can trust. We will need to know what the help will look like. So if you or somebody you know is in crisis and you decide to ACCESS RESOURCES to get help. What can you expect to happen next?

‘What will a crisis intervention look like?’

Each program is different, but all professional licensed counselors adhere to regulations when it comes to crisis intervention. Crisis Intervention should not be confused with traditional Therapy or Counseling. Crisis Intervention is used in acute situations to assist those who are in urgent need of help.

  • hanging at end of ropeTheir behavior constitutes a danger of inflicting serious physical harm upon oneself, including attempted suicide or the serious threat thereof, or if the threat is expected that it will be carried out.
  • There is potential that the continued behavior can reasonably be expected to  result in serious physical harm to others.
    Behavior in which a person is likely to come to serious physical harm or serious illness because he/she is unable to provide for his basic physical needs.
  • They are showing signs that they are suffering severe and abnormal mental, and emotional issues and that these issues are significantly impairing judgment, reason, behavior or capacity to recognize part of reality.

These four guidelines are reasons for a Crisis Intervention. It is after intervention and when the person is back to more stable that they would benefit from therapy or Counseling in hopes of creating a new healthy baseline.

A Crisis Specialist will ask a series of questions to identify relevant safety issues, and to assess if the person meets the criteria above. Some of these questions may seem intrusive when asked, but regulations dictate that the level of safety is assessed. Here are some sample questions to expect:

Safety Assessment Questions

  • Have you had any thoughts or actions, now or in the past, to do anything to hurt yourself?
  • Are you concerned about your ability to maintain your own safety?
  • Is anyone else concerned about your ability to maintain your safety?
  • What, exactly, are any thoughts you have had or are having to hurt yourself?
  • Do you have a plan on what you would actually do to hurt yourself?
  • Have you ever acted on these thoughts? What did you do?
  • Regarding any past actions to hurt yourself, was your intention to hurt yourself, die, let someone know how bad things are?
  • What were you trying to get away from or are you trying to get away from, by doing something to hurt yourself?
  • How are you hoping hurting yourself/killing yourself will solve your problems?
  • Do you have the means to hurt yourself? Do you have access to weapons or drugs?
  • Has anyone in your family ever hurt themselves/committed suicide?
  • What level of support do you have in your life?
  • Are you willing to make a no-harm contract with me?sub_crisisinterv
Steps in Crisis Intervention:

  • Define the Problem. Explore and define the problem from the patient’s point of view. Use active listening, including open-ended questions. Attend to both verbal and nonverbal communications.
  • Ensure Personal Safety. Assess lethality, criticality, immobility and seriousness of threat to patient’s physical, emotional and psychological safety. Assess internal impact as well as environmental situation.
  • Provide Support. Communicate (by words, voice, and body language) a caring, positive, non-possessive, nonjudgmental, acceptant, personal involvement with the one in crisis and the family.
  • Examine Alternatives. Assist in brainstorming choices available now. Search for immediate supports. These supports might include hospitalization or rehabilitation facility
  • Plan. Develop a plan with your patient which: provides something concrete and positive for the patient to do now with definite action steps which the patient can own and comprehend.

Before leaving

  • Ask the patient to verbally summarize the plan and commitment.
  • Demonstrate your part of the commitment if you collaborate.
  • Follow up on the patient’s performance or in obtaining assistance.

Click Suicide Assessment Five-Step Evaluation and Triage (SAFE-T) to receive a FREE digital copy of suicide assessment guidelines put out by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

 

For Help or more information on Crisis Intervention please visit FireStrong.org.

Health and Wellness

Chappy’s Weight Loss Solution Chapter-2

Picture-for-Meet-ChappyIn the depths of my collapse, I found a relationship with God and began to help other alcoholics in the 12 step program and at the local hospital in Newport as a volunteer and eventually as a counselor/consultant to businesses in Rhode Island and two nearby states. My life of recovery and sobriety was aided by a strong Christian participation in the church and eventually led to a ministry as a pastoral counselor following a move to Florida in 1988.

In 1994 I established a Christian counseling ministry: Hope Ministries Inc.(hopeministriesflorida.org) in Palm Bay Florida, a ministry that focused on helping hearts heal for Christians who were struggling. I was ordained as a minister at the start of Hope Ministries and the ministry flourished. In late 2005 I began to desire the expansion our ministry to the workplace and a friend at the local Mental Health Center suggested that what I wanted was to be a workplace Chaplain.

I started offering a Chaplaincy to local businesses and enjoyed this work, but did not feel fulfilled because most of the businesses did not take the chaplaincy seriously. In the process, I had a flashback memory of Screen Shot 2015-04-28 at 8.53.34 PMthe wonderful relationship that I had with the Newport Fire Department when I was on the City Council and it occurred to me that local fire departments might be interested in a serious commitment to Fire Chaplaincy.

I began introducing my self to several departments offering myself to be their Chaplain. Several departments showed interest in having me be their Chaplain but Chief Jon Macdonald of The Indialantic Fire Rescue Department actually invited me to be a member of their volunteer association and to be the Chaplain to the entire department that was a combination department. However, Chief Macdonald insisted that I take the Fire I class to be eligible for certification as a Fire Fighter if I wanted to be his Chaplain.

So, at 65 I took the full Fire I class. The Chief said it would be all right if I could not complete all the physical requirements because of my age. I took that as a challenge. The classroom instruction was very difficult for me because I am not mechanically inclined. However, at the end of the class I had passed everything including the physical requirements. Chief suggested that I take the test for state certification which I passed with great help from God and so I began to ride Engine 57 on emergency calls and grew to love being a volunteer firefighter as well as serving as Chaplain. All of the members of our department welcomed me as their Chaplain and as a volunteer Fire I firefighter.

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